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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
obama in the 2008 elections and has been relatively quiet on that subject in recent months. who better to talk about the democracy movements in the middle east, north africa and u.s. politics and the president's new budget and much more. welcome back, george. >> my pleasure. >> do you think what is going on in the arab world right now reminds you of 1989 when you were very active in helping those countries move to freedom? >> it is very similar. it's historic event, at least equally importance to what happened then. and it really is a spontaneous desire of people living in closed societies to shake off the dictatorship and corrupt regimes and to move towards democracy. the big difference between 1989 and now is that there it was a -- the soviet dictatorship that was collapsing. here its our allies that are changing. and now we have to actually regain the confidence and alliance of the people in these countries. >> in eastern europe, the people were for us because we opposed those regimes. >> that's right. >> here we have supported the regimes so the people look at us, at least with som
suleiman has said unequivocally that the president will not step down. president obama said he must stay in office in order to steer changes through. it appears that president mubarak is going to stay. what happens next? >> well, fareed, i think this is onlyi i continuing the sta continuing the stand-off. i think the people are very clear that mubarak has to retire, in dignity but he has to go. there's a huge question of credibility. people have no credibility, if he doesn't leave, the regime would retrench and then come back with vengeance. and you hear different voices. very clear he should go. frank wisner came with this statement saying that mubarak must stay which created a lot of confusion, lot of disappointment, i should say to you here in egypt. people who are very happy with barack obama's statement that the time is now. mubarak will be stubborn but it's not really a person of issue, it's an issue of the country. people want to see a new regime and mubarak to step down is a clear indication that we are on the throes of the second republic, if you like. unless he does that, we wi
choice. i think mrs. obama being out there encouraging people in a positive way to eat well and to exercise and be healthy, i don't have a problem with that. >> what michelle obama is proposing is not that the government tells you can't eat dessert. michelle obama is proposed is we recognize that we have a serious obesity crisis which we do. >> that's today's sound of sunday. thank you for watching "state of the union." >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. why it just may be the beginning, i'll give you my take. why it may be just the beginning. let me tell you who is on the program. first up, who benefits from democracy in the middle east, iran or the united states? and did the obama administration drop the ball on libya? our guest is paul wolfowitz, who has worked in senior posts for ronald reagan and bush one and the controversial deputy secretary of defense for george w. bush. in all of those positions an outspoken advocate for democracy around the world and especially the middle ea
and wholeheartedly. i think this sun fair. the obama administration faced a genuinely difficult balancing act. on the one side was hosni mubarak's regime, it kept the peace with israel, fought al qaeda, and other islamic terrorists. blockaded hamas and did everything washington asked of it. on the other hand was the vital need to support the people in egypt in their morally justified and politically powerful quest for democracy. let's look at what other presidents in such situations did. ronald reagan faced a similar dilemma with the marcos. marcos ran a repressive regime but was an ally of america. unrest in the philippines began in august of '93 when they assassinated an opposition leader. it took ronald reagan three years to decide to push marcos to leave office. bill clinton faced a somewhat similar problem with indonesia in 1997. and for months all of the administration did was issue calls for reform. finally, a year and a half after the protests began, the clinton administration acquiesced it is a imf pushed so hard out of office. it took barack obama one week to shift from a policy of
my take. who benefits from democracy in the middle east, iran or the united states? did the obama administration drop the ball on libya? our guest is paul wolfowitz, who has worked in senior posts for ronald reagan and bush one and the controversial deputy secretary of defense for george w. bush. in all of those positions an outspoken advocate for democracy around the world and especially the middle east. >>> then, what the in world? how food prices are only likely to get higher and why that could be a big problem for you and me and many world leaders too. >>> next up, michael lewis on the economy and the banks. the author of the "the blindside", money ball and the big short revisits the financial crisis two years later. finally, a last look at a memo you wouldn't want to get from your boss. let's talk about the middle east. we're watching these gripping, moving crises unfold, but there is a broader story to be told, one that explains why the events in tun is ya have triggered a serieses of repercussions from morocco to iran. i would argue that for the first time in a thousand yea
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)